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Middle Ages 1150 -1485

The next family mentioned in records as owning Haseley was the Basset family, one of whom appeared at Runnymead on the side of King John against the barons at the signing of Magna Carta, 1215. As a reward he was made Governor of Oxford Castle and Chief Justice of England, to the anger of the barons. Tiles, ornamented with a double-headed spread eagle (badge of the Roman Emperors) were made for this family and can be seen on the South Wall of the church near the font. It is thought that the stone coffins along the wall of the south aisle were also made for the Basset family.

Evidently Haseley was of some importance by the time of John, for he held his court, hunted in the woods, and dispensed justice here on at least one recorded occasion, and in 1228 Henry III granted permission for a Monday market to be held here. and later for an annual fair lasting three days to be held the day after St. Peter's day (29th June). Iron, salt and woollen cloth were the chief articles sold, and there was always a collection for St. Peter's Pence, which went to St Peter's church in Rome.

The chancel of the church was built in Henry III's reign (1216??1272) when the Manor belonged to Roger le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England. In 1332 as a result of a quarrel with Edward III, v the lands were taken from Roger's family and bestowed upon William de Bohn, Earl of Hereford and Northampton. He commanded three divisions at the Battle of Crecy, 1346.

By 1415, the time of the battle of Agincourt, Haseley had given its name to a family, for a George Haseley is mentioned in records in that battle.

By about 1440 Little Haseley and Lachford (lache = sluggish stream) were owned by a family called Pypard, who, in return for their lands, had to follow the King 80 days in the year with two men in full armour.

Haseley itself and the patronage of the Rectory were given to the College of Windsor (it had belonged to Lincoln) and up to Queen Victoria's time the Dean of Windsor was also Rector of Haseley, though he usually put in a priest and let out the Glebe land belonging to the Church on lease.

Haseley itself and the patronage of the Rectory were given to the College of Windsor (it had belonged to Lincoln) and up to Queen Victoria's time the Dean of Windsor was also Rector of Haseley, though he usually put in a priest and let out the Glebe land belonging to the Church on lease.

William Lenthall of Herefordshire married one of the Pypards and came into possession of Latchford, where there was a chapel and small monastery built by one of the priests of Haseley. There was constant trouble with the Abbot of Thame during the 15th Century because the people of Latchford paid dues to Haseley instead of to him and at one time he sent men to burn down the chapel. They took the silver candlesticks and crucifix and burnt the charter. The monks of Latchford appealed to the King for redress; he said they could claim damages if they could produce the charter, but since it had been burnt, this could not be done, so the chapel was never rebuilt

One of the Lenthall family left money for candles for the Church and for fourteen poor men and sixteen poor women to have a feast in the churchyard on certain occasions. The food was to consist of white bread, roast meat, beer, apples and pasties. Money was also left for the replacement of rushes on the floor of the Church.


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